Already vs All Ready

What is the difference?

Already and All Ready are two commonly confused word pairs in the English language. When do you use each one? 

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Should you say, "We are already for work"?

Or should you say, "We are all ready for work"?

Are you already or all ready packed?

These two word pairs are confusing to many learners. In this lesson, you will learn the differences between already and all ready.

Already (one word)

Already is an adverb that can mean:
  • before now (Example: They have already eaten. So they are not hungry now.)

  • before a specified time (Example: By the time I got there, she has already left. So we did not meet.)

  • so soon (Example: Do we have to leave already? It was so much fun!)
Remember, an adverb is a word that describes or gives more information about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or an entire sentence.

  • Sarah has suffered a lot already.

    (Sarah has suffered a lot by this time.)

  • Is it noon already?

    (It is noon so soon?)

  • The plane had already left for the airport.

    (The plane had previously left for the airport.)

  • I am already tired.

    (I am now tired.)

  • I can't believe she is old enough to drive already!

    (I can't believe she is old enough to drive so soon!)

  • Has Nick already finished his homework?

    (Has Nick finished his homework so soon?)

    student writing

All ready (two words)

All ready is a two-word phrase that means completely prepared. We use it to say that something, someone, or everyone in a group is completely prepared.

All ready is a way to put emphasis on the word ready. Ready means prepared. All ready means completely prepared.

Bill is ready. (Bill is prepared.)

Bill is all ready. (Bill is completely prepared.)

  • I am all ready to walk the dog.

    (I am completely prepared to walk the dog.)

  • They are all ready for the big meeting.

    (They are completely prepared for the big meeting.)

  • They have their coats and are all ready to leave.

    (They have their coats and are completely prepared to leave.)

  • The teacher is all ready for class.

    (The teacher is completely prepared for class.)

  • Tim and Jill are all ready for the wedding.

    (Tim and Jill are completely prepared for the wedding.)

  • Are you all ready to go camping this weekend?

    (Are you completely prepared to go camping this weekend?)

  • He was not all ready for the final exam.

    (He was not completely prepared for the final exam.)


Let's practice!

Now, it is your turn to try with these exercises. Complete each sentence with already or all ready. Then, scroll below the picture for the answers.

1. The football players are already/all ready for tonight's game.

2. When I got home, she was already/all ready cooking dinner.

3. It is only 2:00 p.m., but I am already/all ready tired.

4. Is Dustin already/all ready for his job interview?

5. My bags are packed, and I'm already/all ready to go!



1. The football players are all ready for tonight's game.

2. When I got home, she was already cooking dinner.

3. It is only 2:00 p.m., but I am already tired.

4. Is Dustin all ready for his job interview?

5. My bags are packed, and I'm all ready to go!

Did you get them all correct? If not, just keep practicing! You can do it!

These were the differences of already and all ready. Now that you understand, it is time to practice your English! Get our ESL workbooks and story books.

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