English Nouns


NounsAn noun is a word that names a person, a place or a thing.

Examples:
Sarah, lady, cat, New York, Canada, room, school, football, reading.

Example sentences:
  • People like to go to the beach.
  • Emma passed the test.
  • My parents are traveling to Japan next month.

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The word "noun" comes from the Latin word nomen, which means "name," and nouns are indeed how we name people, places and things.


Abstract Nouns

An abstract noun is a noun that names an idea, not a physical thing.

Love is an abstract noun.

Love

Examples:
Hope, interest, peace, ability, success, knowledge, trouble.


Concrete Nouns

A concrete noun is a noun that names a physical thing.

House is a concrete noun.

House
Examples:
Boy, table, floor, coffee, beach, king, rain, children, professor.


Common Nouns

A common noun is a noun that names a general thing, not a specific thing.

Cat is a common noun.

Cat

Examples:
Boy, girl, city, country, company, planet, location, war.


Proper Nouns

A proper noun is a noun that indicates the specific name of a thing. It begins with a capital letter.

Mabel (this cat's name) is a proper noun.

Kitten

Examples:
Robin, Alice, London, Sweden, Google, Earth, Eiffel Tower, Civil War.
(Compare these examples to those in the "Common nouns" section to see the difference.)


Countable Nouns

A countable noun is a noun that indicates something you could actually count.

Cup is a countable noun.

Cup

For example, you could count pigs: one pig, two pigs, three pigs...
However, you couldn't count water: one water, two water – no, it doesn't work...

A countable noun has both a singular and a plural form, and it can be used with the indefinite articles (a/an).

Examples:
Window, teacher, tree, lion, eye, cloud, pencil, heart, movie.

Click here to read more about countable nouns.


Uncountable Nouns

An uncountable noun is a noun that indicates something you cannot count.

Water is an uncountable noun.

Water

For example, you could count pigs: one pig, two pigs, three pigs...
However, you couldn't count water: one water, two water – no, it doesn't work...

An uncountable noun has only one form (no plural), and it cannot be used with the indefinite articles (a/an).

Examples:
Furniture, advice, mail, news, equipment, luggage, work, coffee, information.

Click here to read more about uncountable nouns.

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