Parts of a Sentence Worksheets


Can you recognize a subject, object, predicate, and complement in an English sentence? Get some review and practice with these parts of a sentence worksheets!

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You'll need to feel comfortable with how a sentence is constructed if you want to improve your writing and speaking. These worksheets contain illustrations and examples, as well as exercises and an answer key so that you can practice the skills.

Can you find the subject and the predicate in an English sentence? Do you remember the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs? How about the difference between objects and complements?

It sounds like a lot to keep in mind, but it's really not complicated. First, we'll have a quick review of the different parts of English sentences, and then you can practice these skills with the exercises.

For full, illustrated explanations of all these topics, review the English parts of a sentence article.

Let's start with our quick review.

Subject

To make a sentence in English, we need two basic parts: a subject and a verb.

The subject of an English sentence is the person or thing that performs the action, or that the sentence makes a statement about.

For example:
a girl screaming at a scared cat

  • Maggie screams.

In this sentence, Maggie is the person performing the action. What does Maggie do? She screams.

  • The cat is scared!

In this sentence, the cat performs the action. How does the cat feel? It is scared.

Remember that a subject can be a noun, a pronoun, or a noun phrase.

Predicate

The predicate is the statement that is made about the subject. It contains at least one verb and can have more words that give more information about the subject.

Be sure to review the article on predicates for a full explanation.

For example:
a happy man jumping

  • Fred is jumping happily through his house.
As we just saw above, the subject of this sentence is Fred.

Now, what about Fred? He is jumping happily through his house. This is a simple predicate because it contains one verb. Remember that a simple predicate can have lots of other words that give more information!

  • Fred is jumping, laughing, and singing.
In this sentence, we have a compound predicate because there is more than one verb.

Objects and transitive and intransitive verbs

In English, there are two kinds of verbs: transitive and intransitive. Those names might sound confusing, but it's really very simple.

Transitive verbs take objects. This means that the action of the verb affects something else. The person or thing that the verb affects in some way is an object.

For example:
a man with freshly baked cookies

  • Gerald baked some cookies!

What did Gerald bake? He baked some cookies. The cookies were directly affected by his action. They were baked!

Because the cookies were directly affected by Gerald's action, they are the direct object of the transitive verb "baked."

Now, let's imagine that Gerald had someone special in mind when he baked those cookies.

  • Gerald baked his friends some cookies.
Now, we know that the cookies were directly affected by Gerald's action. His friends were indirectly affected by his baking because he gave them the cookies. So, his friends are the indirect object of the verb "baked."

The indirect object comes between the verb and the direct object, like in the example above.

subject + verb + indirect object direct object


Now, there's only one more kind of object: the object of the preposition. These objects are very easy to identify because they always come right after a preposition.

  • Gerald baked some cookies for his friends.
In this case, his friends are the object of the preposition because of the preposition for.

Complements and linking verbs

There is a special group of verbs in English called linking verbs. They are very common and let us give more information about the subject with an adjective or a noun that describes it.

So, this adjective or noun (or adjective phrase or noun phrase) is the complement! It gives more information about the subject and always follows a linking verb.

Be sure to review the articles on complements for full, illustrated explanations.

For example:
a happy woman reading at home

  • Jill is a bus driver.
In this sentence, the linking verb be lets us introduce the complement a bus driver, a noun phrase that gives more information about her.

  • She looks happy.
In this sentence, the linking verb look lets us introduce the complement happy, an adjective that gives us more information about her.

  • She becomes sleepy after she reads.
In this sentence, the linking verb become lets us introduce the complement sleepy, an adjective that gives us more information about her.



So, those are the basic parts of an English sentence! Now, let's get some practice with the exercises.

Exercise A: Subjects and predicates

Complete the subjects under each picture with the predicates from the table to form a complete sentence.

Predicates:

won't have time to finish all those dishes before the guests arrive!
is having a conversation at the office.
really has a very mess closet!
ran because he was in a big hurry.
forgot to put on his trousers this morning!


Subjects:

1.
a group of men talking

The group of men ____________________


2.
a boy running

Jimmy ____________________


3.
a woman with a very messy kitchen

Marie ____________________


4.
a businessman with no trousers on

Mr. Fredrickson ____________________


5.
a man with a messy closet

Craig ____________________


Exercise B: Direct objects

Underline the direct object in the following sentences.

1.
a doctor and patient

Dr. Rodriguez gave his patient advice.


2.
a man with a red block in his hand

The man is holding the red block.


3.
a barbershop quartet singing

They are singing a song for their audience.


4.
a mailman with a heavy bag

He is carrying a heavy bag of mail today!


5.
mothers with their children

The mothers are pushing their children in the park.

Exercise C: Indirect objects

Complete the sentences below by adding the indirect object in the correct place in each sentence. The indirect object is in parentheses () after the sentence.

1.
a man giving good news over the phone

He is giving some good news! (his sister)


2.
a man cooking

He is making dinner. (his children)


3.
a musician with a guitar

Johnny is playing a blues song. (the audience)


4.
a boy with his friends

The little boy has told a joke. (them)


5.
a boy painting a picture

My son painted a beautiful picture! (me)

Exercise D: The object of the preposition

Use the prepositions from the table to complete the sentences below. The object of the preposition is in bold.


to
between
on
for
into


1.
a man at a part

Ted threw a party _____ his best friend.


2.
a tired traveler

The tourist carried his bags _____ the hotel.


3.
a girl on thin ice in winter

Lily is afraid to step _____ the ice.


4.
a man throwing his monitor in the trash

He kicked his computer monitor _____ a big trash can.


5.
three kids in the back seat of a car

Penny has to sit _____ her brothers.

Exercise E: Linking verbs and complements

Match the correct complements from Table B with the subjects and linking verbs from Table A. Use the pictures in Table A to help.

Table A: Subjects and linking verbs

1. The mother and her little baby seem

a mother and baby playing happily
2. That garbage smells

a man with smelly garbage
3. In the evening, Geoff becomes

a man asleep in his chair
4. The boy looks

an unhappy boy being teased
5. Peter is

a farmer on his tractor


Table B: Complements

a. sad.
b. very happy!
c. a farmer.
d. terrible.
e. tired.

Answer Key

Exercise A: Subjects and predicates
1. The group of men is having a conversation at the office.
2. Jimmy ran because he was in a big hurry.
3. Marie won't have time to finish all those dishes before the guests arrive!
4. Mr. Fredrickson forgot to put on his trousers this morning!
5. Craig really has a very mess closet!

Exercise B: Direct objects
1. Dr. Rodriguez gave his patient advice.
2. The man is holding the red block.
3. They are singing a song for their audience.
4. He is carrying a heavy bag of mail today!
5. The mothers are pushing their children in the park.

Exercise C: Indirect objects
1. He is giving his sister some good news!
2. He is making his children dinner.
3. Johnny is playing the audience a blues song.
4. The little boy has told them a joke.
5. My son painted me a beautiful picture!

Exercise D: The object of the preposition
1. Ted threw a party for his best friend.
2. The tourist carried his bags to the hotel.
3. Lily is afraid to step on the ice.
4. He kicked his computer monitor into a big trash can.
5. Penny has to sit between her brothers.

Exercise E: Linking verbs and complements
1. The mother and her little baby seem very happy.
2. That garbage smells terrible.
3. In the evening, Geoff becomes tired.
4. The boy looks sad.
5. Peter is a farmer.



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